Deltic Night Index

Released: June 2017 | Data: February 2017 – April 2017

PETER MARKS
CHIEF EXECUTIVE, THE DELTIC GROUP

I have often spoken about the fact that the late night economy is an important contributor to the wealth and health of a town centre. Late night leisure businesses are known for creating jobs and drawing people to the high street, but as our latest research has shown, their impact is more far-reaching. Not only do people spend money on getting ready for a late night out, supporting our high streets in the process, we’ve also seen a positive link between an individual’s mental and physical wellbeing and a fun night out.

With so much in the news about the importance of both physical and mental wellbeing, it’s great to see that Brits feel that late night leisure activities have a positive impact on both their physical and mental wellbeing. Over a third (35.6%) of respondents, and over half (55.4%) of 18-21 year olds, said that they felt better about themselves when they have a good/fun late night out. It’s clear to me that the night time economy is more important than ever before.

Our third Deltic Night Index supports a trend we have seen for some time now. Clubbers are looking for exciting and unique experiences to share with friends both offline and online, with a greater focus on entertainment, premium service and drinks.

It highlights the importance for late night operators to continually innovate their offer and to place a greater focus on entertainment and creating unique experiences. The three reports have shown us that Brits do like a good night out but in a market that changes so quickly it’s vital that we always think about what else we can do to ensure we give our customers a reason to come back time and again.

In March 2016, The Deltic Group led by Chief Executive Peter Marks, picked up three awards at the Publican Awards, winning ‘Best Late Night Operator’, ‘Best Pub Operations Team’ and ‘Responsible Retailer of the Year’, showcasing the results of the hard work put in by the team.

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HEADLINE FINDINGS
JUNE 2017 – THE LATE NIGHT ECONOMY

  • Consumer spending on late night leisure is up by 3% (or £3.30) to £55.56 on the last quarter
  • The average late night out lasted 4 hours 49 minutes, a 28 minute increase on the last quarter
  • Spending on pre-drinks, transport, entry fees and drinks in the venue have all increased, while expenditure on food has decreased by 12.3% (or £1.97) compared to the last quarter
  • Spending on drinks in late night venues has increased by 50% (or £2.70) to£17.32
  • Spending on entry fees increased by 1% (or £0.96) when compared to the previous quarter
  • 2% of Brits go on a late night out at least once a week
  • Over a third of respondents believe that a late night out has a positive impact on their overall mood (35.4%), their mental wellbeing (34.8%) and their relationship with friends (34.0%)
  • Over half (50.8%) of respondents say they always go for a quality brand when choosing a drink, a number which increases to 8% amongst 18-21 year olds

 

LATE NIGHT ECONOMY
SPENDING BY LATE NIGHT ACTIVITY

  • Pubs remain the most popular late night activity, with just under a quarter (24.2%) of respondents spending the most money in pubs each month
  • 2% of 18-21 year olds spend the most money in clubs each month
  • Amongst the 18-21 age group clubbing saw an increase of 9% compared to the last quarter
  • The top three late night activities for men are pubs, followed by the cinema and then clubs and bars joint third
  • For women, clubbing is now one of the top three late night leisure activities, overtaking The top three activities are now pubs, cinema and then clubs

 


 

LATE NIGHT ECONOMY SPENDING BY LATE NIGHT ACTIVITY: REGIONAL BREAKDOWN

  • People from Brighton are most likely to spend more money on clubbing each month than on any other late night activity
  • People from Bristol are most likely to spend more money on going to the cinema each month than on any other late night activity, whereas people from Newcastle and Brighton are likely to spend the least
  • Going to the pub is the most popular late night activity in the majority of These were Belfast, Birmingham, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester, Newcastle, Norwich, Plymouth, Sheffield and Southampton

 

 

LATE NIGHT SPEND MIX

Spending on pre-drinks, transport, entry fees and drinks in the venue have all increased, while expenditure on food has decreased.

  • Brits spend £55.56 on an average late night When compared to the last quarter overall spending on late night activities is up by 6.3% (£3.30)
  • Brits spend an average of £9.78 on pre drinks, £14.00 on food, £8.18 on transport, £6.28 on entry fee and £17.32 on drinks in the venue on a late night out
  • 18-21 year olds spend the most money on pre-drinks at £10.57. This is an increase of 4% compared to the previous quarter
  • Women spend more money on pre-drinks, food, transport and entry fees, whereas men spend more on drinks in the venue

 

 

LATE NIGHT SPEND MIX: REGIONAL BREAKDOWN

Pre-drinks
Glasgow £11.73
Leeds £8.14
Liverpool £8.37
Manchester £11.05
Newcastle £8.05
Southampton £10.53

Food
Edinburgh £15.86
Leeds £11.86
Liverpool £12.22
London £15.49
Newcastle £10.92
Southampton £15.70

Transport
Brighton £6.73
Edinburgh £5.85
Glasgow £9.05
Leeds £6.47
London £9.01
Norwich £8.94

Entry fee
Belfast £8.99
Brighton £3.18
Edinburgh £3.37
Glasgow £7.35
London £8.44
Norwich £7.25
Nottingham £3.92

Drinks in the venue
Belfast £19.65
Brighton £16.32
Bristol £15.52
Edinburgh £20.42
Glasgow £19.55
Sheffield £16.29

 

LATE NIGHT TIMINGS

  • The average night out lasted 4 hours 49 minutes, a 28 minute increase on the last quarter
  • On average women respondents who go on late nights out leave home at 19:55 whereas men on average leave home for a night out at 19:37
  • Respondents aged 18-21 are likely to be the last to leave the house for a late night out, with the average time being 20:17
  • For 2 in 5 respondents (40%), the average late night out lasts 3-4 hours
  • For just under 2 in 5 respondents (39%), the average late night out lasts 5-6 hours
  • On average, respondents aged 26-30 have the longest night out with an average of 5 hours and 7 mins

 

 

LATE NIGHT TIMINGS: REGIONAL BREAKDOWN

  • For those from Newcastle, the average night out lasts 33 hours (the longest of any city) followed by Cardiff and Edinburgh
  • For the second quarter in a row, people from Leeds tended to have the shortest nights out at 55 hours
  • Nearly 8% of people from Norwich say their average late night out lasts between 9 and 10 hours

 

 

PLANNING A LATE NIGHT

  • The top 5 ways respondents choose where to go when planning a night out are:
    • Recommendations (no change)
    • Friends being tagged on Facebook (up one place)
    • Google Search (down one place)
    • Online reviews (no change)
    • Club photos (new entry)
  • Over half (50.9%) respondents choose where to go on a late night out based on recommendations. This has decreased by 1% from the previous quarter
  • Over 1 in 5 (22.0%) respondents choose where to go on a late night out by friends being tagged on This has increased by 3.3% from the previous quarter

 

 

WHY DO WE GO OUT?

  • For the third quarter in a row, seeing friends remains top of the list of reasons Brits go on a late night out, with 9% citing this is as the main reason
  • This is followed by escaping the stress of day to day life (40,3%) and to celebrate an occasion (30.5%)
  • 2% of women say that a top reason for going on a night out is to celebrate an occasion. Whereas, less than a quarter of men (23.6%) say this is a main reason
  • Over 1 in 10 men (12.3%) said that a main reason for them going on a night out is to meet a potential partner, but this is true for just 1 in 20 (5.3%) women
  • 5% of 18-30 year olds said that a main reason for them going on a night out is to meet a potential partner

 

 

FREQUENCY OF LATE NIGHTS

  • When compared to the last quarter, the average number of times Brits go on a late night out has increased from 89 days a week to 1.26 days a week
  • Compared to the last quarter, the number of people who go on late night out 2-3 times a week is up by 0.7%, and the number people going on a late night out 4-6 times a week is up by 0.5%
  • On average, over two thirds (69.8%) of Brits aged 18-21 go on at least one late night out each week, up from 67.4% last quarter
  • Nearly a quarter (24.1%) of 18-21 year olds go out on late nights 2 to 3 times a week, this is up by 2% when compared to the last quarter. The number of 18-21 year olds who go out 4-6 days a week has also increased by 4.7% for the same period
  • On average, British men continue to go out on late nights out more often than British women (1.41 times weekly for men vs 11 per week for women). When compared to the last quarter the frequency of late night outs for both sexes has increased
  • Over 1 in 10 (11.2%) Brits aged 18-30 go on late night out 4-6 times a week
  • In the following cities, people are most likely to go on a late night out at least once a week
    • Brighton (48.7%)
    • London (44.1%)
    • Bristol (41.0%)
    • Glasgow (40.2%)
    • Manchester (39.8%)

 

 

SAFETY

  • 94.9% of Brits continue to feel safe staying with their friends on a night out (compared to 96.0% last quarter)
  • 7% of Brits feel safe keeping their belongings with them at all times on a night out. This is a small increase from 85.4% last quarter
  • Top ten cities were people felt somewhat to extremely safe traveling by themselves on a late night out:

↑       Glasgow

↑       Cardiff

↑       Plymouth

↑       Liverpool

↑       Southampton

↓       Edinburgh

↑       Newcastle

↓       Nottingham

↓       Norwich

↑       Sheffield

 

 

SPECIAL FOCUS:
Physical and mental well being

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 6% of respondents, and 52.8% of 18-25 year olds, said they felt better about themselves when they have a good/fun late night out
  • Almost 3 in 10 (27.5%) respondents said that going on a late night out makes them feel good which benefits their mental wellbeing
  • Over a third of respondents believe that a late night out has a positive impact on their overall mood (35.4%), their mental wellbeing (34.8%) and their relationship with friends (34.0%). There was little regional A fifth (20.3%) of Brits feel that a late night out has a positive impact on their confidence
  • 1% of respondents said that keeping fit and looking good was important to them as they like to look their best on a night out
  • Over half (50.8%) of respondents agreed that when choosing a drink, they always go for a quality brand, with 1 in 6 (15.7%) of respondents stating that they strongly agree

REGIONAL FOCUS

  • Those in Brighton are most likely to believe that a late night out has a positive impact on their confidence with 6% saying it does, while those in Newcastle are least, with only 11.5% of respondents feeling it effects their confidence
  • 9% of respondents in Brighton felt that a late night out is very important to their social life, while only 22.1% of those in Newcastle did
  • A quarter (25.3%) of Bristol residents and almost a quarter of London (24.6%) and Manchester (24.2%) said they purchase better quality drinks / services because it looks better on social media, compared to just 9.6% of those in Newcastle, and 10.5% of respondents in Leeds
  • In preparation for a late night out:
    — 0% of those in Edinburgh and 73.7% in Birmingham spend money on new clothes and shoes, compared to just 47.2% in Liverpool
    — 4% of those in Belfast spend money on hair treatments, compared to 25.7% of those in Brighton
    — 0% of those in Brighton spend money on makeup, compared to just 17.3% in Southampton
    — 3% of those in Norwich spend money on beauty treatments, compared to 11.1% in Sheffield

METHODOLOGY

Sample size: 2,444

Sampling theory:

The Censuswide panel was originally recruited via sampling specialists and since has grown organically. Panellists can opt to answer all surveys – but will be filtered out if a survey is not relevant to them. Panellists are also invited to participate in surveys via a newsletter.

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Question types:

Text, pictures, video and audio can be included in the survey – the question types include single and multiple response, sliding scales, grids and open ended questions.

Reporting:

We can provide the data in a variety of formats – Word, Excel, PowerPoint, SPSS.

As standard, you will receive four demographic breakdowns as part of the survey package and providing they have been requested beforehand, we can also offer a wide range of splits, varying from household income to which supermarket the respondent shops in.

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